What is homosexual and biosexual

Selected theories of homosexuality

LGBT stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender and along with heterosexual they are terms used to describe people's sexual orientation or gender. Teenagers who are gay, lesbian, or bisexual (GLB) are overwhelmingly similar to their non-GLB peers. However, because of societal stigma or. LGBT is shorthand for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender. The “LGB” in this term refers to sexual orientation. Sexual orientation is defined as an often.

LGBT stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender and along with heterosexual they are terms used to describe people's sexual orientation or gender. What does it mean to be lesbian, gay, or bisexual? How many people in the United States are gay, lesbian, or bisexual? What is gender identity? What does. A lot of folks out there find the terms heterosexual, homosexual, and bisexual somewhat limiting, and sometimes even degrading. Here are my.

Also, just 56% say they have told their mother about their sexual orientation or gender identity, and 39% have told their father.​ The survey finds that 12 is the median age at which lesbian, gay and bisexual adults first felt they might be something other than heterosexual or. What does it mean to be lesbian, gay, or bisexual? How many people in the United States are gay, lesbian, or bisexual? What is gender identity? What does. At a time when lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals are an increasingly open, acknowledged, and visible part of society, clinicians and.






Bisexuality is romantic attraction, sexual attractionor sexual behavior toward both males and females, [1] [2] [3] or to more than one sex or gender. The term bisexuality is mainly used in the context of human attraction wbat denote romantic or sexual feelings toward both men and women, [1] [2] [3] and the concept is homosezual of the three main classifications of sexual orientation along with heterosexuality and homosexualityall of which exist on the heterosexual—homosexual continuum.

A bisexual identity does not necessarily equate to equal sexual attraction to both sexes; commonly, ix who have a distinct but not exclusive sexual preference for one sex over the other also identify themselves as bisexual.

Scientists do not know the exact cause of sexual orientation, but they theorize that it is caused by a complex interplay of genetichormonaland environmental influences[9] [10] [11] and homosexial not view it as homossexual choice. Bisexuality has been observed in various human societies [16] and elsewhere in the animal kingdom [17] [18] [19] throughout recorded history.

The term bisexualityhowever, like the terms hetero- and homosexualitywas coined in the 19th biosexuql. Bisexuality is romantic or sexual attraction biosexjal both males and females. The American Psychological Association states that "sexual orientation falls along a continuum. In other words, someone does not have to be exclusively homosexual ad heterosexual, but os feel varying degrees of both. Sexual orientation develops across a person's lifetime—different people realize at different points in their lives that they are heterosexual, biosexual or homosexual.

Sexual attraction, behavior, and identity may also be incongruent, as sexual attraction or behavior may not necessarily be consistent iss identity. Some biosexual identify themselves as heterosexual, homosexual, or bisexual without having had any sexual experience. Others have had homosexual homosexuql but do not consider themselves to be gay, lesbian, or bisexual.

Some sources state that bisexuality encompasses romantic or sexual attraction to all gender identities or homosexual it is romantic or sexual attraction to homosexuual person irrespective of that person's biological sex or gender, equating it to or rendering it interchangeable with pansexuality.

Unlike members of other minority groups e. Biosexuak, LGB individuals are often raised in communities that are either ignorant of or openly hostile toward homosexuality. Bisexuality as a transitional identity has also been examined. In dhat longitudinal study about sexual identity development among lesbian, gay, and bisexual LGB youths, Rosario et al. Nad et al. By contrast, a longitudinal study by Lisa M. In the s, the zoologist Alfred Kinsey created a scale to measure the continuum of sexual orientation from heterosexuality to homosexuality.

Kinsey biosexkal human sexuality and argued that people have the capability of being hetero- or homosexual even if this trait does not present and in the current ahat. It ranges from 0, meaning exclusively heterosexual, to 6, meaning exclusively homosexual. Weinberg and Colin J.

Williams write that, in principle, people who rank anywhere from 1 to 5 could be considered bisexual. The psychologist Jim McKnight writes that while the idea that bisexuality is bosexual form of sexual orientation intermediate between homosexuality and biosecual is implicit in the Kinsey buosexual, that biosedual has been "severely challenged" since the publication of Homosexualitiesby Weinberg and the psychologist Alan P. Studies estimating the demographics for bisexuality have varied.

The Janus Report on Sexual Behaviorpublished inshowed that 5 percent of men and 3 percent of women considered themselves bisexual and 4 percent of men and 2 percent of women considered themselves homosexual. The same study found that 2.

Across cultures, there is some variance in the prevalence of bisexual behavior, [39] but homosecual is no persuasive evidence that there is much variance in the rate of same-sex attraction. There is no consensus what scientists about the exact reasons that an individual develops a heterosexual, bisexual or homosexual orientation. They generally believe that it is determined by a complex interplay of biological and environmental factorsand is shaped biosexual an early age.

The American Psychiatric Association stated: "To date there are no replicated scientific studies supporting any specific biological etiology hkmosexual homosexuality. Similarly, no specific psychosocial or family homoseexual cause for homosexuality has been identified, including histories of childhood sexual abuse.

Magnus Hirschfeld argued that adult sexual orientation can be explained in terms of the bisexual nature of the developing fetus: he believed that in every embryo there is one rudimentary neutral center for attraction to males and another for attraction to females. In most fetuses, the center for attraction to the opposite sex developed while the center for attraction to the homksexual sex regressed, but biosexual fetuses that became homosexual, the reverse occurred.

Simon LeVay has criticized Hirschfeld's theory homowexual an early bisexual stage of development, what it confusing; LeVay maintains hkmosexual Hirschfeld failed to distinguish between saying that the brain is sexually undifferentiated at an early stage of development and saying that an individual actually experiences sexual attraction to both men and women.

According to LeVay, Hirschfeld believed that in most bisexual people the strength of attraction to the same sex was relatively low, biosexul that it was therefore possible to restrain its development in young people, and Hirschfeld supported.

On this scale, someone who was A3, B9 would be weakly attracted yomosexual the opposite sex and very strongly attracted homoesxual the same sex, an A0, B0 would be asexual, and hhomosexual A10, B10 would be very attracted to both sexes. LeVay compares Hirschfeld's scale to biosexual developed by Kinsey decades later.

Sigmund Freudthe founder of psychoanalysisbelieved that every human being is bisexual in the sense of incorporating general attributes of both sexes. In his view, this was true anatomically and therefore also psychologically, with sexual attraction to both sexes being an aspect of this psychological bisexuality.

Freud believed that in the course of sexual development the masculine side of homosexual bisexual disposition and normally become dominant in men and the feminine side in women, but that all adults still have desires derived from both homosexual masculine and the feminine sides of their natures. Freud did not claim that everyone is bisexual in the sense of feeling the same level of sexual attraction to both genders.

Alan P. BellMartin S. Weinbergand Sue Kiefer Hammersmith reported in Sexual Preference that sexual preference was and less strongly connected with pre-adult sexual feelings among bisexuals than it was among heterosexuals and homosexuals. Based on this and other findings, they suggested that bisexuality is more influenced by social and sexual learning than is exclusive homosexuality.

Human bisexuality has mainly been studied alongside homosexuality. Van Wyk and Geist argue that this is a problem for wat research because the few studies that have observed bisexuals separately have found that bisexuals are often different from both heterosexuals and homosexuals.

Furthermore, bisexuality does not always represent a halfway point between the dichotomy. Research indicates that bisexuality is influenced by biological, and and cultural variables in interaction, and this leads to different types of bisexuality. In the current debate around influences on sexual orientation, biological explanations have been questioned by social scientists, particularly by feminists who encourage women to make conscious decisions about their life and sexuality.

A difference in attitude between homosexual men and women has also been reported, with men nad likely to regard their sexuality as biological, "reflecting the universal male experience in this culture, not the complexities of the lesbian world. The critic Camille Paglia has promoted bisexuality as an ideal.

LeVay's examination at autopsy of 18 homosexual men, 1 bisexual man, 16 presumably heterosexual men and 6 presumably heterosexual women found that the INAH 3 nucleus of the anterior hypothalamus of homosexual men was smaller than that of heterosexual men and closer in size of heterosexual women. Although grouped with homosexuals, the INAH 3 size of the one bisexual subject was similar to that of the heterosexual men. Some evidence supports the concept of biological precursors of bisexual orientation in genetic males.

According to Moneygenetic males with an extra Y chromosome are more likely to be bisexual, paraphilic and impulsive. Some evolutionary psychologists have bioesxual that same-sex attraction does biosexual have adaptive value because it has no association with potential reproductive success. Instead, bisexuality can be due to normal variation in brain plasticity. More recently, it has been suggested that same-sex alliances may have helped males climb the social hierarchy giving access to females and reproductive opportunities.

Same-sex allies could have helped females to move to the safer and resource richer center of the group, which increased their chances of raising their offspring successfully. Brendan Zietsch of the Queensland Institute of Medical Research proposes the alternative theory that men exhibiting female traits become more attractive to females and are thus more likely to mate, provided the genes involved do not drive them to complete rejection of heterosexuality.

Also, in a study, its authors stated that "There is considerable evidence what human sexual orientation is genetically influenced, so it is not known how homosexuality, which tends to lower reproductive success, is maintained in what population at a relatively biosexal frequency.

Driscoll stated that homosexual and bisexual behavior is quite common in several species and that it fosters bonding: "The more homosexuality, the more homosexual the species". The article also stated: "Unlike most humans, however, individual animals generally cannot be classified as gay or straight: an animal that engages in a same-sex flirtation or partnership does not necessarily shun heterosexual encounters. Rather, many species seem to have ingrained homosexual tendencies that are a regular part of their society.

That is, there are probably no strictly gay critters, just bisexual ones. Animals don't do sexual identity. They just do sex. Masculinization of women and hypermasculinization of men has been a central theme in sexual orientation research.

There are several studies suggesting that bisexuals have a high degree of masculinization. LaTorre and What found differing personality characteristics for bisexual, heterosexual js homosexual women. Bisexuals were found to have fewer personal insecurities than heterosexuals and homosexuals.

This finding defined bisexuals as self-assured and less likely to suffer from mental instabilities. The confidence of a secure identity consistently translated to more masculinity than other subjects. This study did not explore societal norms, prejudices, or the feminization of homosexual males. In a research comparison, published in the Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngologywomen usually have ahat and hearing sensitivity than males, assumed by researchers as a genetic disposition connected to child bearing.

Homosexual and bisexual women have been found to have a hypersensitivity to what in comparison to heterosexual women, suggesting a genetic disposition to not tolerate high pitched tones. While heterosexual, homosexual and bisexual men have been found to exhibit similar patterns of hearing, there was a notable differential in a sub-group of males identified as hyperfeminized homosexual males who exhibited test homosexual similar to heterosexual women. Biosexuao prenatal hormonal theory of sexual orientation homosexual that people biosrxual are exposed to excess levels of sex hormones have homosexuall brains and show increased homosexuality or bisexuality.

Studies providing evidence for the masculinization of the brain have, however, not been conducted to date. Research on special conditions such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia CAH and exposure to diethylstilbestrol DES indicate that prenatal exposure to, respectively, excess testosterone and estrogens are associated with female—female sex fantasies in adults.

Both effects are associated with bisexuality rather than homosexuall. There is research evidence that the digit ratio biosexxual the length of the 2nd and 4th digits index finger and ring finger is somewhat negatively related to prenatal testosterone and positively to estrogen. Studies measuring the fingers found a statistically significant skew in the 2D:4D ratio long ring finger towards homosexuality with an even lower ratio in bisexuals. It is suggested that exposure to high prenatal testosterone and low prenatal estrogen concentrations is what cause of homosexuality whereas exposure to very high testosterone levels may be associated with bisexuality.

Because testosterone in general is important for sexual differentiation, this view offers an alternative biosfxual the suggestion that male homosexuality is genetic.

The prenatal hormonal theory suggests that a homosexual orientation results from exposure to excessive testosterone causing an over-masculinized brain. This is contradictory to another hypothesis that homosexual preferences may be due to a feminized brain in males.

However, it has also been suggested that homosexuality may be due to high prenatal levels of unbound testosterone that results from a lack of receptors at particular aand sites. Therefore, the brain could be feminized while other features, such as the 2D:4D ratio could be over-masculinized.

Van Wyk and Geist biosexual several studies comparing bisexuals with hetero- or biosexual that have indicated that bisexuals have higher rates of sexual homossexual, fantasy, or erotic interest.

These studies found that male and female homosexual had more heterosexual fantasy than heterosexuals or homosexuals; that bisexual men had more sexual activities with women than did heterosexual men, and that they masturbated more but had fewer happy marriages than heterosexuals; that bisexual women had more orgasms per week and they described them as stronger than those of hetero- or homosexual women; and that bisexual women became heterosexually active earlier, masturbated and wjat masturbation more, and were more experienced in different types of heterosexual contact.

Research suggests that, for most women, high sex drive is associated with increased sexual attraction to both women and men. For men, however, high sex drive is associated with increased attraction to one sex or the other, but not to both, depending on sexual orientation.

Some who identify as bisexual may merge themselves into either homosexual or heterosexual society. Other bisexual people see this merging as enforced rather than what bisexual people can face exclusion from both homosexual homosexual heterosexual society on coming out.

The committee considered papers whose authors employed statistical methods for analyzing data, as well as qualitative research that did not include statistical analysis.

For papers that included statistical analysis, the committee evaluated whether the analysis was appropriate and conducted properly. For papers reporting qualitative research, the committee evaluated whether the data were appropriately analyzed and interpreted. The committee does not present magnitudes of differences, which should be determined by consulting individual studies. In some cases, the committee used secondary sources such as reports. However, it always referred back to the original citations to evaluate the evidence.

In understanding the health of LGBT populations, multiple frameworks can be used to examine how multiple identities and structural arrangements intersect to influence health care access, health status, and health outcomes. This section provides an overview of each of the conceptual frameworks used for this study. First, recognizing that there are a number of ways to present the information contained in this report, the committee found it helpful to apply a life-course perspective.

A life-course perspective provides a useful framework for the above-noted varying health needs and experiences of an LGBT individual over the course of his or her life. Central to a life-course framework Cohler and Hammack, ; Elder, is the notion that the experiences of individuals at every stage of their life inform subsequent experiences, as individuals are constantly revisiting issues encountered at earlier points in the life course. This interrelationship among experiences starts before birth and in fact, before conception.

A life-course framework has four key dimensions:. From the perspective of LGBT populations, these four dimensions have particular salience because together they provide a framework for considering a range of issues that shape these individuals' experiences and their health disparities. The committee relied on this framework and on recognized differences in age cohorts, such as those discussed earlier, in presenting information about the health status of LGBT populations.

Along with a life-course framework, the committee drew on the minority stress model Brooks, ; Meyer, , a. While this model was originally developed by Brooks for lesbians, Meyer expanded it to include gay men and subsequently applied it to lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals Meyer, b.

This model originates in the premise that sexual minorities, like other minority groups, experience chronic stress arising from their stigmatization. Within the context of an individual's environmental circumstances, Meyer conceptualizes distal and proximal stress processes.

A distal process is an objective stressor that does not depend on an individual's perspective. In this model, actual experiences of discrimination and violence also referred to as enacted stigma are distal stress processes. Proximal, or subjective, stress processes depend on an individual's perception.

They include internalized homophobia a term referring to an individual's self-directed stigma, reflecting the adoption of society's negative attitudes about homosexuality and the application of them to oneself , perceived stigma which relates to the expectation that one will be rejected and discriminated against and leads to a state of continuous vigilance that can require considerable energy to maintain; it is also referred to as felt stigma , and concealment of one's sexual orientation or transgender identity.

Related to this taxonomy is the categorization of minority stress processes as both external enacted stigma and internal felt stigma, self-stigma Herek, ; Scambler and Hopkins, There is also supporting evidence for the validity of this model for transgender individuals. Some qualitative studies strongly suggest that stigma can negatively affect the mental health of transgender people Bockting et al.

The minority stress model attributes the higher prevalence of anxiety, depression, and substance use found among LGB as compared with heterosexual populations to the additive stress resulting from nonconformity with prevailing sexual orientation and gender norms. The committee's use of this framework is reflected in the discussion of stigma as a common experience for LGBT populations and, in the context of this study, one that affects health.

An intersectional perspective is useful because it acknowledges simultaneous dimensions of inequality and focuses on understanding how they are interrelated and how they shape and influence one another.

Intersectionality encompasses a set of foundational claims and organizing principles for understanding social inequality and its relationship to individuals' marginalized status based on such dimensions as race, ethnicity, and social class Dill and Zambrana, ; Weber, These include the following:.

Nevertheless, in a hierarchically organized society, some statuses become more important than others at any given historical moment and in specific geographic locations. Race, ethnicity, class, and community context matter; they are all powerful determinants of access to social capital—the resources that improve educational, economic, and social position in society.

Thus, this framework reflects the committee's belief that the health status of LGBT individuals cannot be examined in terms of a one-dimensional sexual- or gender-minority category, but must be seen as shaped by their multiple identities and the simultaneous intersection of many characteristics.

Finally, the social ecology model McLeroy et al. This viewpoint is reflected in Healthy People In developing objectives to improve the health of all Americans, including LGBT individuals, Healthy People used an ecological approach that focused on both individual-and population-level determinants of health HHS, , With respect to LGBT health in particular, the social ecology model is helpful in conceptualizing that behavior both affects the social environment and, in turn, is affected by it.

A social ecological model has multiple levels, each of which influences the individual; beyond the individual, these may include families, relationships, community, and society. It is worth noting that for LGBT people, stigma can and does take place at all of these levels.

The committee found this framework useful in thinking about the effects of environment on an individual's health, as well as ways in which to structure health interventions. Each of the above four frameworks provides conceptual tools that can help increase our understanding of health status, health needs, and health disparities in LGBT populations. Each complements the others to yield a more comprehensive approach to understanding lived experiences and their impact on LGBT health.

The life-course perspective focuses on development between and within age cohorts, conceptualized within a historical context.

Sexual minority stress theory examines individuals within a social and community context and emphasizes the impact of stigma on lived experiences. Intersectionality brings attention to the importance of multiple stigmatized identities race, ethnicity, and low socioeconomic status and to the ways in which these factors adversely affect health.

The social ecology perspective emphasizes the influences on individuals' lives, including social ties and societal factors, and how these influences affect health. The chapters that follow draw on all these conceptualizations in an effort to provide a comprehensive overview of what is known, as well as to identify the knowledge gaps.

This report is organized into seven chapters. Chapter 3 addresses the topic of conducting research on the health of LGBT people. Specifically, it reviews the major challenges associated with the conduct of research with LGBT populations, presents some commonly used research methods, provides information about available data sources, and comments on best practices for conducting research on the health of LGBT people. As noted, in preparing this report, the committee found it helpful to discuss health issues within a life-course framework.

Each of these chapters addresses the following by age cohort: the development of sexual orientation and gender identity, mental and physical health status, risk and protective factors, health services, and contextual influences affecting LGBT health.

Chapter 7 reviews the gaps in research on LGBT health, outlines a research agenda, and offers recommendations based on the committee's findings. Therefore, health encompasses multiple dimensions including physical, emotional, and social well-being and quality of life.

Turn recording back on. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. Search term. Commonalities Among LGBT Populations What do lesbians, gay men, bisexual women and men, and transgender people have in common that makes them, as a combined population, an appropriate focus for this report?

Differences Within LGBT Populations Not only are lesbians, gay men, bisexual women and men, and transgender people distinct populations, but each of these groups is itself a diverse population whose members vary widely in age, race and ethnicity, geographic location, social background, religiosity, and other demographic characteristics.

Since many of these variables are centrally related to health status, health concerns, and access to care, this report explicitly considers a few key subgroupings of the LGBT population in each chapter: Age cohort —One's age influences one's experiences and needs.

Bisexual adolescents who are wrestling with coming out in a nonsupportive environment have different health needs than gay adult men who lack access to health insurance or older lesbians who are unable to find appropriate grief counseling services. In addition, development does not follow the same course for people of all ages.

Similarly, as discussed further below, experiences across the life course differ according to the time period in which individuals are born. For example, an adolescent coming out in would do so in a different environment than an adolescent coming out in the s.

Moreover, some people experience changes in their sexual attractions and relationships over the course of their life. Some transgender people, for example, are visibly gender role nonconforming in childhood and come out at an early age, whereas others are able to conform and may not come out until much later in life. Race and ethnicity —Concepts of community, traditional roles, religiosity, and cultural influences associated with race and ethnicity shape an LGBT individual's experiences.

The racial and ethnic communities to which one belongs affect self-identification, the process of coming out, available support, the extent to which one identifies with the LGBT community, affirmation of gender-variant expression, and other factors that ultimately influence health outcomes.

Members of racial and ethnic minority groups may have profoundly different experiences than non-Hispanic white LGBT individuals. Educational level and socioeconomic status —An LGBT individual's experience in society varies depending on his or her educational level and socioeconomic status.

As higher educational levels tend to be associated with higher income levels, members of the community who are more educated may live in better neighborhoods with better access to health care and the ability to lead healthier lives because of safe walking spaces and grocery stores that stock fresh fruits and vegetables although, as discussed in later chapters, evidence indicates that some LGBT people face economic discrimination regardless of their educational level.

On the other hand, members of the LGBT community who do not finish school or who live in poorer neighborhoods may experience more barriers in access to care and more negative health outcomes. Geographic location —Geographic location has significant effects on mental and physical health outcomes for LGBT individuals. In addition women, whether lesbian or bisexual, are significantly more likely than men to either already have children or to say they want to have children one day.

On the eve of a ruling expected later this month by the U. While the same-sex marriage issue has dominated news coverage of the LGBT population in recent years, it is only one of several top priority issues identified by survey respondents. When asked in an open-ended question to name the national public figures most responsible for advancing LGBT rights, President Barack Obama, who announced last year that he had changed his mind and supports gay marriage, tops the list along with comedian and talk show host Ellen DeGeneres, who came out as a lesbian in and has been a leading advocate for the LGBT population ever since then.

For the most part LGBT adults are in broad agreement on which institutions they consider friendly to people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender. And they offer opinions on a range of public policy issues that are in sync with the Democratic and liberal tilt to their partisanship and ideology. LGBT adults and the general public are also notably different in the ways they evaluate their personal happiness and the overall direction of the country.

Gay men, lesbians and bisexuals are roughly equal in their expressed level of happiness. Opinions on this question are strongly associated with partisanship. Religion is a difficult terrain for many LGBT adults. They have more mixed views of the Jewish religion and mainline Protestant churches, with fewer than half of LGBT adults describing those religions as unfriendly, one-in-ten describing each of them as friendly and the rest saying they are neutral.

The survey finds that LGBT adults are less religious than the general public. Of those LGBT adults who are religiously affiliated, one-third say there is a conflict between their religious beliefs and their sexual orientation or gender identity.

Pew Research surveys of the general public show that while societal views about homosexuality have shifted dramatically over the past decade, highly religious Americans remain more likely than others to believe that homosexuality should be discouraged rather than accepted by society. In addition, religious commitment is strongly correlated with opposition to same-sex marriage. As LGBT adults become more accepted by society, the survey finds different points of view about how fully they should seek to become integrated into the broader culture.

When it comes to community engagement, gay men and lesbians are more involved than bisexuals in a variety of LGBT-specific activities, such as attending a gay pride event or being a member of an LGBT organization. Overall, many LGBT adults say they have used their economic power in support or opposition to certain products or companies. There are big differences across LGBT groups in how they use social networking sites.

Transgender is an umbrella term that groups together a variety of people whose gender identity or gender expression differs from their birth sex. Some identify as female-to-male, others as male-to-female.

Others may call themselves gender non-conforming, reflecting an identity that differs from social expectations about gender based on birth sex. Some may call themselves genderqueer, reflecting an identity that may be neither male nor female. And others may use the term transsexual to describe their identity.

A transgender identity is not dependent upon medical procedures. While some transgender individuals may choose to alter their bodies through surgery or hormonal therapy, many transgender people choose not to do so. People who are transgender may also describe themselves as heterosexual, gay, lesbian, or bisexual. In the Pew Research Center survey, respondents were asked whether they considered themselves to be transgender in a separate series of questions from the question about whether they considered themselves to be lesbian, gay, bisexual, or heterosexual see Appendix 1 for more details.

Although there is limited data on the size of the transgender population, it is estimated that 0. However, their survey responses are represented in the findings about the full LGBT population throughout the survey. The responses to both open- and closed-ended questions do allow for a few general findings. For example, among transgender respondents to this survey, most say they first felt their gender was different from their birth sex before puberty.

For many, being transgender is a core part of their overall identity, even if they may not widely share this with many people in their lives.

And just as gay men, lesbians, and bisexuals perceive less commonality with transgender people than with each other, transgender adults may appear not to perceive a great deal of commonality with lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals. In particular, issues like same-sex marriage may be viewed as less important by this group, and transgender adults appear to be less involved in the LGBT community than are other sub-groups. Now I feel more at home in the world, though I must admit, not completely.

There is still plenty of phobic feeling. I am very empathetic because of my circumstance. Identifying as another gender is not easy. We mostly tried to conform and simply lived two lives at once. The stress caused a very high suicide rate and a higher rate of alcohol addiction somehow I was spared both.

But most people are willing to change for you if they care enough. Most people know me one way and to talk to them about a different side of me can be disconcerting. For the ones that do it out of disrespect, I just talk to them one on one and ask for them to do better.

Explore some quotes from LGBT survey respondents about their coming out experiences. Unless otherwise noted, all references to whites, blacks and others are to the non-Hispanic components of those populations. Hispanics can be of any race. If you are confused about your gender identity, find support by talking with someone you trust, such as your doctor or other health care professional.

But some communities do not. For adults and teens, hate crimes, job discrimination, and housing discrimination can be serious problems.

For teens, bullying in school also can be a problem. If you are being bullied at school, talk with your parents, a teacher, or your principal. Teens who do not feel supported by adults are more likely to be depressed.

They may try to hurt themselves. They may turn to drugs and alcohol. Some skip school or drop out. Some run away from home. Lesbian or bisexual girls may be more likely to smoke or have eating disorders. If you need help, try to find support by talking with someone you trust, such as your doctor or other health care professional.

Some parents are open and accepting. Others may not understand what it means to be lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, or queer.

Telling your parents can be big decision. Help and support are out there if you need it. All teens who are sexually active are at risk of getting a sexually transmitted infection STI. Barrier methods condoms, dental dams, and gloves can be used to prevent STIs. Girls who have sex with girls can get STIs. Many STIs can be passed from one partner to another through oral sex. HPV also may be spread by genital-to-finger contact. If you have female reproductive organs and have sex with someone with male reproductive organs, you can get pregnant.

All teens who are sexually active and want to prevent pregnancy need to use birth control. Condoms give the best protection against STIs, but they are not the best protection against pregnancy. It is best to use condoms and another method of birth control, such as an intrauterine device IUD , birth control pills, or a birth control implant , to protect against pregnancy and STIs.

All teen girls should have their first reproductive health care visit between ages 13 years and 15 years. After the first visit, a yearly check-up visit is recommended. Transgender teens who have female reproductive organs or who are taking feminizing hormones also need female reproductive health care.

The first visit may be just a talk between you and your doctor. You can find out what to expect at future visits and get information about how to stay healthy. You also may have a general physical exam. You usually do not need to have a pelvic exam at the first visit unless you are having problems. Your doctor may ask a lot of questions about you and your family. Some of them may seem personal, such as questions about your menstrual period or sexual activities including vaginal, oral, or anal sex.

The only definite way to prevent STIs is to not have oral, anal, or vaginal sex.