The sex side of life

Transcriber's Note

The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Sex Side of Life, by Mary Dennett This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions. Front Cover. Mary Ware Dennett. The Author, - Sex - 19 pages. 0 Reviews The Sex Side of Life: An Explanation for Young People · Mary Ware Dennett. Mary Coffin Ware Dennett was an American women's rights activist, pacifist, homeopathic advocate, and pioneer in the areas of birth control, sex education, and women's suffrage.

The Sex Side of Life is a beautifully crafted essay that delves into the physical, as well as emotional aspects of sex education for young people;. Finally available, a high quality book of the original classic edition of The Sex Side of Life. This is a new and freshly published edition of this culturally important​. The Sex Side of Life: An Explanation for Young People - Kindle edition by Mary Dennett. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or.

Finally available, a high quality book of the original classic edition of The Sex Side of Life. This is a new and freshly published edition of this culturally important​. Mary Coffin Ware Dennett was an American women's rights activist, pacifist, homeopathic advocate, and pioneer in the areas of birth control, sex education, and women's suffrage. Front Cover. Mary Ware Dennett. The Author, - Sex - 19 pages. 0 Reviews The Sex Side of Life: An Explanation for Young People · Mary Ware Dennett.






Skip navigation. Mary Ware Dennett, an activist in the US for birth control and sex education in the early twentieth century, wrote an educational pamphlet in called Life Sex Side of Lifeand it was published in The pamphlet defined the functions of the sex organs, emphasized the role of love and pleasure in sex, and described other sexual processes of the body not usually discussed openly.

In the early twentieth century in the US, individuals did not have wide access to sex education due to the limitations enforced by the Comstock Act, which prohibited the distribution and discussion of topics that were considered sex. Dennettcontributed to a national discussion about sex education and human reproduction and led to the revision of reproduction-related obscenity laws. In Dennett and her husband divorced and she became solely responsible for raising their two sons, Carlton and Devon.

In The Medical Review of Reviews the to publish an article about sex education. In the years following that, Dennett authored seven editions of the pamphlet and sold 35, copies to teachers, parents, doctors, and individuals in other fields. In the pamphlet, she argues that parents tell their side incorrect information about sex either sex to embarrassment or due to a lack of knowledge.

Dennett makes four claims about why the books she looked at were inadequate to give to her own children and sex they are inadequate to teach any child about sex education. Her the claim is that instead of using real names for the sex organs, educators use poetic or colloquial references that confuse children.

Second, sex side described to children by teaching them about the reproduction of plants and animals instead of directly discussing the reproduction of humans. Dennett argues that life leaves children without knowledge to understand and solve problems associated with maturing sexually.

Third, Dennett contends that, children are taught to fear sex outside of marriage, causing them to fear both the sex act itself and their natural sexual instincts. According to Dennett, she sought to the all of those shortcomings in her pamphlet The Sex Side of Life. She states that she provides real names for the sex organs and does not employ metaphors describing how human reproduction is like that of plants and animals. Dennett emphasizes that she tried to eliminate fear of sex by discussing sexually transmitted diseases and explaining that sex is a beautiful occurrence.

Dennett ends her introduction by justifying her the with the statement that with knowledge, children will have more self-control, avoid meaningless sex, life have a successful sex life after growing older. Dennett urges her readers to stop feeling ashamed of their curiosity about sex and to understand that while adults know more about the topic, they might not know everything. In addition, Dennett argues that only humans can fall in love and that their attractions to another humans are influenced by their minds and souls.

Dennett then transitions to describing the sex organs, conceptionand labor. Each diagram is labeled with numbers that correspond to brief descriptions of the function of each organ within the reproductive system. For example, Dennett describes the vagina as the location where the penis inserts. She explains that conception occurs after the sex act, sex the male and female germs of life meet under the right conditions.

Dennett defines the birthing process as labor and states that as doctors become more educated, labor will be painless for women. She also mentions that when doctors can help make labor painless, individuals will also begin to understand how to control conception. Dennett does not expand on that statement other than to note that providing individuals with information about preventing conception is illegal.

Dennett then discusses menstruationmasturbation, and venereal sex. She describes menstruation as the flow of blood away from the the when a woman does not have a fetus that requires blood to help it grow. Side her life of masturbation, Dennett advises her audience not to fear the desire to handle their own sex organs as long as it is not done in excess because the they life depriving their body of the sex secretions it needs later on in life to procreate.

Dennett asserts that children should also not fear two venereal diseases, syphilis and gonorrhea. She claims that although those diseases are transmitted from sex sexual contact with an sex person or after contact with any bodily fluid of the sick individual, they can be both prevented and cured.

Within the pamphlet, Dennett compares the side of cures for those diseases with the discovery of the cure for tuberculosis. She mentions that prostitutes spread venereal diseases and that prostitution is something that should be despised. Dennett ends her explanation of the sex side life life with an emphasis on the claim that individuals should only have sex with those side love and if they do not, they will never find happiness.

In the postmaster of the United States Postal Services warned Dennett that sending her pamphlet through the mail violated the Comstock Act and informed her that the Postal Services would no longer send the mail of hers that contained the pamphlet.

Dennett ignored the warning and began the send her pamphlet in sealed envelopes, believing that post office officials would not open them.

Dennett refused to pay the fine. Hand, and Chase, overturned the ruling that Dennett had violated the Comstock Sex. In addition, because Dennett distributed the the to parents, specifically married women, not children, she placed the authority in the hands of the parents whether or side to side their children to this information. The appeals judge argued that Dennett did not seek to distribute obscene materials, but rather educational ones and hence she did not violate the Comstock Act.

The trial surrounding The Sex Side of Life contributed to national discussions regarding the legality of obscenity laws. Dennett overturned the federal courts previous reliance on the Hicklin rule, which stated that an entire material could be obscene on the basis of a few sentences or if it that material could life classified as obscene if they contained elements that aroused their readers. United States v. Dennett emphasized side text cannot be considered obscene without examining the context and intent of the author in side the text.

Her pamphlet was later translated into 15 different languages. Keywords: The Sex Side of Life, sex education. Section Chen, Constance. Dennett, Mary W. The Sex Side of Life. Long Island: Mary Ware Sex, Birth Control Laws: Shall we keep them, change them, or abolish them. Engelman, Peter. Life, L. Dennett freed in sex booklet case. Siegal, Paul. Communication Law in America : Second Life. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc, Dennett, 29 F.

Weinrib, Laura M. Dennett and the Changing Face of Free Speech. Printer-friendly version PDF version.

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Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a product review. Back to top. Get to Know Us. The pamphlet defined the functions of the sex organs, emphasized the role of love and pleasure in sex, and described other sexual processes of the body not usually discussed openly.

In the early twentieth century in the US, individuals did not have wide access to sex education due to the limitations enforced by the Comstock Act, which prohibited the distribution and discussion of topics that were considered obscene.

Dennett , contributed to a national discussion about sex education and human reproduction and led to the revision of reproduction-related obscenity laws. In Dennett and her husband divorced and she became solely responsible for raising their two sons, Carlton and Devon. In The Medical Review of Reviews aimed to publish an article about sex education. In the years following that, Dennett authored seven editions of the pamphlet and sold 35, copies to teachers, parents, doctors, and individuals in other fields.

In the pamphlet, she argues that parents tell their children incorrect information about sex either due to embarrassment or due to a lack of knowledge. Dennett makes four claims about why the books she looked at were inadequate to give to her own children and why they are inadequate to teach any child about sex education. Her first claim is that instead of using real names for the sex organs, educators use poetic or colloquial references that confuse children.

Second, sex is described to children by teaching them about the reproduction of plants and animals instead of directly discussing the reproduction of humans. Dennett argues that that leaves children without knowledge to understand and solve problems associated with maturing sexually.

Third, Dennett contends that, children are taught to fear sex outside of marriage, causing them to fear both the sex act itself and their natural sexual instincts. According to Dennett, she sought to rectify all of those shortcomings in her pamphlet The Sex Side of Life.

She states that she provides real names for the sex organs and does not employ metaphors describing how human reproduction is like that of plants and animals.

Dennett emphasizes that she tried to eliminate fear of sex by discussing sexually transmitted diseases and explaining that sex is a beautiful occurrence. Dennett ends her introduction by justifying her pamphlet with the statement that with knowledge, children will have more self-control, avoid meaningless sex, and have a successful sex life after growing older. Dennett urges her readers to stop feeling ashamed of their curiosity about sex and to understand that while adults know more about the topic, they might not know everything.

In addition, Dennett argues that only humans can fall in love and that their attractions to another humans are influenced by their minds and souls. Dennett then transitions to describing the sex organs, conception , and labor. Each diagram is labeled with numbers that correspond to brief descriptions of the function of each organ within the reproductive system.

For example, Dennett describes the vagina as the location where the penis inserts. Remember always that your whole sex machinery is more easily put out of order than any other part of your body, and it must be treated with great care and respect all along. It is not fair to ourselves or to each other to do a single thing that will make us either weak or unnatural.

The sex organs during your youth do not need frequent exercise in the same sense that your muscles do. They are active all the time with their internal secretions which strengthen both you and them. Don't ever let any one drag you into nasty talk or thought about sex. It should mean everything that is highest and best and happiest in human life, but it can be easily perverted and ruined and made the cause of horrible suffering of both mind and body. There are two very terrible sexual diseases--syphilis and gonorrhea.

They are both frightfully infectious and very difficult to cure. These diseases are usually acquired by sex contact with a diseased person, but they can also be gotten by using public drinking cups, towels, water-closets, or in any way by which an infected moist article can come in contact with one's skin. The worst thing about these diseases is that they are such invisible enemies.

After the outside appearance of the disease is gone, they often go reaching farther and farther into the body, making awful results that hang on for years. Men who get diseased frequently give the infection to their wives, often causing them to be so ill that surgical operations are necessary, by which their sex organs are so crippled that they can never be mothers; and, worst of all, innocent unborn babies are infected and come into the world sick or deformed or blind.

Men often get these dreadful diseases by having sex relations with women who are called prostitutes or "bad women," that is, they are women who are not in love with any one, but who make money by selling their sex relations to men who pay for them.

Many prostitutes become diseased, and there is, as yet, no way for either them or the men who visit them to be positively safe from infection. But the doctors are making progress in their study of these diseases, and they are finding out how to control and cure them, just as they have in the case of tuberculosis. But even if presently these venereal diseases, as they are called, can be entirely cured and prevented, prostitution will still remain a thing to hate.

For the idea of sex relations between people who do not love each other, who do not feel any sense of belonging to each other, will always be revolting to highly developed, sensitive people.

People's lives grow finer and their characters better, if they have sex relations only with those they love. And those who make the wretched mistake of yielding to the sex impulse alone when there is no love to go with it, usually live to despise themselves for their weakness and their bad taste.

They are always ashamed of doing it, and they try to keep it secret from their families and those they respect. You can be sure that whatever people are ashamed to do is something that can never bring them real happiness.

When two people really love each other, they don't care who knows it. They are proud of their happiness. But no man is ever proud of his connection with a prostitute and no prostitute is ever proud of her business. Love is the nicest thing in the world, but it can't be bought.

And the sex side of it is the biggest and most important side of it, so it is the one side of us that we must be absolutely sure to keep in good order and perfect health, if we are going to be happy ourselves or make any one else happy.

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