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We want to hear from women who have or have had breast cancer and are suffering from sexual problems. Breast cancer can affect your daily life in different ways, depending on what stage It's common for women to lose interest in sex after breast cancer treatment. How breast cancer affects you sexually will be unique to you, but these pages may offer useful tips and information. You may not feel like having sex or being intimate at a time when you're dealing with breast A woman looking concerned​.

Breast development and satisfaction in women with disorders/differences of sex development. van de Grift TC(1)(2)(3), Kreukels BPC(2)(3);. Mammary intercourse is a sex act, performed as either foreplay or as non-​penetrative sex, that involves the stimulation of a man's penis by a woman's breasts and vice versa. It involves placing the penis between a woman's breasts and moving the breast), and it was one of the nine substitute exercises for penetrative sexual. We want to hear from women who have or have had breast cancer and are suffering from sexual problems.

Breast cancer can affect your daily life in different ways, depending on what stage It's common for women to lose interest in sex after breast cancer treatment. changes in your sex life after breast cancer treatment. Many women report having less sex than before their illness, for several reasons. Mammary intercourse is a sex act, performed as either foreplay or as non-​penetrative sex, that involves the stimulation of a man's penis by a woman's breasts and vice versa. It involves placing the penis between a woman's breasts and moving the breast), and it was one of the nine substitute exercises for penetrative sexual.






Being diagnosed with sex cancer and having treatment will almost certainly affect how you feel about sex and intimate relationships. How breast cancer affects you sexually will be unique to you, breast these pages may offer useful tips and breast. Or sex may be worried about starting a relationship in the future.

Treatments for breast cancer can have physical and emotional effects such as pain and sensitivity, and menopausal women such as vaginal dryness. You may be anxious about your first sexual experience following your diagnosis, sex worried things won't be the same as before. Any changes to your body for example hair loss, and changes following surgery can affect your confidence breast feelings about yourself. This can affect how you feel breast sex, how you relate to a partner or how your partner relates to you.

Becca gives you strategies, hints and women to address concerns around sex, intimacy and body image. To hear from us, enter breast email address below. Skip to main content. Home Information and support Facing breast cancer Living with and beyond breast sex Your body. How breast cancer can affect women Being diagnosed with breast cancer and having treatment will almost certainly affect how you feel about sex and intimate relationships.

Coping with changes to sex and women relationships. Changes to your body. Sex and intimacy: your stories. Find more support with our Women app. Try Sex.

Creating the right mood may help you relax and increase your confidence. Lighting, music or aromatherapy oils can help create a comfortable and sensual atmosphere.

Some women may feel uncomfortable naked and choose to wear nightwear. Others wear a prosthesis and bra to bed. Sensual and genital touching, with a partner and on your own, can help remove anxiety associated with sex and can be a helpful starting point for people resuming sexual activity.

If you have a partner you can share your discoveries with them to make sex as fulfilling as possible. Non-sexual cuddling, taking gradual steps and relearning how to give each other pleasure can help. If having your breasts stimulated was an important part of your sex life, losing a breast or changes to a breast through surgery and radiotherapy may have a big impact on your sexual satisfaction. You may experience areas of numbness and sensitivity, or loss of sensitivity.

This sense of loss may be shared by your partner if they gained sexual pleasure from the look or feel of your breasts. How you feel about having your breasts touched after treatment is very personal.

You may want your partner to touch the area that was treated, or you may not want any touching at all. Your partner may also feel differently about touching your breasts after treatment. If you find talking about it embarrassing, you could use your hand to guide them.

How you feel about having your breasts touched may change over time. You and your partner may also want to change your focus to other areas of the body to help you feel sexually satisfied. Some women find sex toys, such as vibrators and clitoral stimulators, helpful in finding out more about what gives pleasure see the tips above. Breast cancer and its treatments can have a number of emotional effects, such as anxiety, which can also affect sex, intimacy and your relationships.

The following information outlines how anxiety, worries about sex or low mood and depression might affect your sex life, and includes tips on what might help. Feelings of anxiety are common for many women with breast cancer. Anxiety may be only short term, or may continue for some time after your treatment is over.

You may be worried about initiating physical intimacy, or concerned that your partner no longer finds you attractive. You may be fearful that your relationship can no longer be what it was, or anxious about how to approach new relationships. All these feelings are normal and it may take time before they lessen or disappear completely. If you have a partner, talking to them about how you feel might ease some of these worries.

It may also help to talk to a close friend or family member about the concerns you have. Your GP or breast care nurse should be able to help arrange this for you. Depression is a term used to describe a broad range of feelings, from being low in spirits to having no will to live. Depression can be a normal response to trauma and a way of coping. As you adjust to what has happened, you will hopefully gain energy and you will notice a change in your mood.

Being depressed can mean you lose interest in sex or find it less pleasurable. If your symptoms of depression continue you may need to seek specialist help. Try talking about how you feel with someone in your treatment team or your GP. They may be able to recommend different ways of helping you through this time. Counselling, talking therapies and drug treatments can all be effective in treating depression. To hear from us, enter your email address below. Skip to main content. Home Information and support Facing breast cancer Living with and beyond breast cancer Your body Sex, intimacy and breast cancer.

Intimate relationships and breast cancer Makeup tutorials. Emotional effects It may take time for you to feel physically well enough or able to cope emotionally with any form of sexual activity. Loss of sexual desire Many women being treated for breast cancer find their desire for sexual contact decreases. Getting back to sex When you feel ready to increase or resume sexual activity, you may want to make some time specifically for you and your partner, free from distractions.

Tips for getting back to sex 1. Start afresh Try not to compare things now to how they were before you were diagnosed with breast cancer. He was waiting for me to give him the go-ahead. Don't let the myths about other people's sex lives get in the way of what's happening in yours. And remember that there are exceptions to every pattern. If your sex life is not working the way you want it to, your doctor or nurse may be able to referee these issues with your partner and you.

You can cue your doctor in advance, since he or she has most likely already touched on delicate issues with you. Maybe he or she can be the tour guide for the two of you. If your partner is there when you talk with the doctor who's managing your care, you and your partner both get a chance to air and dispel fears, and replace myths and false information with facts.

She had breast cancer in both breasts, treated with l lumpectomy and radiation. Her breasts looked great—but her husband was ignoring them completely. I scheduled an appointment that included her husband and was able to reassure him that her breasts would not be harmed by fondling, kissing, or whatever; that he could not catch cancer; and that she was not radioactive.

They quickly resumed their former lovemaking habits. Not all doctors and nurses are comfortable discussing sexual issues and practices. Most doctors don't routinely ask about your sex life. And patients don't usually begin to discuss their love life with a doctor who hasn't mentioned it. Nobody's talking! Someone has to break the pattern. A trained social worker, sex therapist, psychologist, or psychiatrist can help you open up communication with your partner and get around to talking about intimacy and sex issues.

A support group may be more helpful than you might realize.