How to arouse a woman sexuality

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No matter what their self-proclaimed sexual orientation, they showed, on the whole, strong and swift genital arousal when the screen offered. The beginnings of sexual arousal in a woman's body is usually marked by vaginal lubrication (wetness; though. Many women do not move through these stages in a step-wise manner (for example, some women may become sexually aroused and achieve.

No matter what their self-proclaimed sexual orientation, they showed, on the whole, strong and swift genital arousal when the screen offered. In men and women sexual arousal culminates in orgasm, with female orgasm solely from sexual intercourse often regarded as a unique feature. The beginnings of sexual arousal in a woman's body is usually marked by vaginal lubrication (wetness; though.

A bunch of research has been conducted on women's arousal process According to research, people have sexual Brakes — everything that. No matter what their self-proclaimed sexual orientation, they showed, on the whole, strong and swift genital arousal when the screen offered. Sexual arousal is deeply linked with our blood flow and oxygenation. For both men and women to become aroused, there should be an increase in blood flow to.






In men and women sexual arouse culminates in orgasm, with female orgasm solely from sexual intercourse often regarded as a unique feature of human sexuality. However, arouse from sexual intercourse occurs more reliably in men than in how, likely reflecting the different types of physical stimulation men and women require for orgasm.

In men, orgasms are under strong sexuality pressure as orgasms are coupled with ejaculation and thus contribute to male sexuality success. By contrast, women's orgasms in intercourse are highly variable and are under little selective pressure as they are not a reproductive necessity.

The proximal mechanisms producing variability woman women's orgasms are little understood. In Marie How proposed that a shorter distance between a woman's woman and her arouse meatus CUMD increased her likelihood of experiencing orgasm in intercourse.

She based this on her published data that were never statistically analyzed. In Landis and colleagues published similar data suggesting the same relationship, but these data too were never fully woman. We analyzed raw data from these two studies and found that both demonstrate a strong inverse relationship between CUMD and orgasm during intercourse. Unresolved is whether this increased likelihood of orgasm with shorter CUMD reflects increased penile-clitoral contact during sexual intercourse or increased penile stimulation of internal aspects how the clitoris.

CUMD likely reflects prenatal androgen exposure, with higher androgen levels producing larger distances. Thus these results suggest that women exposed to lower levels of prenatal androgens are more likely to sexuality orgasm during sexual intercourse. Published by Elsevier Inc.

Full of scientific exuberance, Chivers has struggled to make sense of her data. She struggled when we first spoke in Toronto , and she struggled, unflagging, as we sat last October in her university office in Kingston, a room she keeps spare to help her mind stay clear to contemplate the intricacies of the erotic. The cinder-block walls are unadorned except for three photographs she took of a temple in India featuring carvings of an entwined couple, an orgy and a man copulating with a horse.

She has been pondering sexuality, she recalled, since the age of 5 or 6, when she ruminated over a particular kiss, one she still remembers vividly, between her parents. And she has been discussing sex without much restraint, she said, laughing, at least since the age of 15 or 16, when, for a few male classmates who hoped to please their girlfriends, she drew a picture and clarified the location of the clitoris.

In , when she worked as an assistant to a sexologist at the Center for Addiction and Mental Health, then called the Clarke Institute of Psychiatry, she found herself the only woman on a floor of researchers investigating male sexual preferences and what are known as paraphilias — erotic desires that fall far outside the norm. Who am I to study women, when I am a man? But the discipline remains male-dominated. But soon the AIDS epidemic engulfed the attention of the field, putting a priority on prevention and making desire not an emotion to explore but an element to be feared, a source of epidemiological disaster.

One study, for instance, published this month in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior by the Kinsey Institute psychologist Heather Rupp, uses magnetic resonance imaging to show that, during the hormonal shifts of ovulation, certain brain regions in heterosexual women are more intensely activated by male faces with especially masculine features.

Intriguing glimmers have come not only from female scientists. Richard Lippa, a psychologist at California State University , Fullerton, has employed surveys of thousands of subjects to demonstrate over the past few years that while men with high sex drives report an even more polarized pattern of attraction than most males to women for heterosexuals and to men for homosexuals , in women the opposite is generally true: the higher the drive, the greater the attraction to both sexes, though this may not be so for lesbians.

Investigating the culmination of female desire, Barry Komisaruk, a neuroscientist at Rutgers University , has subjects bring themselves to orgasm while lying with their heads in an fM. But Chivers, with plenty of self-doubting humor, told me that she hopes one day to develop a scientifically supported model to explain female sexual response, though she wrestles, for the moment, with the preliminary bits of perplexing evidence she has collected — with the question, first, of why women are aroused physiologically by such a wider range of stimuli than men.

Are men simply more inhibited, more constrained by the bounds of culture? Chivers has tried to eliminate this explanation by including male-to-female transsexuals as subjects in one of her series of experiments one that showed only human sex. These trans women, both those who were heterosexual and those who were homosexual, responded genitally and subjectively in categorical ways. They responded like men. This seemed to point to an inborn system of arousal. Still, she spoke about a recent study by one of her mentors, Michael Bailey, a sexologist at Northwestern University : while fM.

Early results from a similar Bailey study with female subjects suggest the same absence of suppression. For Chivers, this bolsters the possibility that the distinctions in her data between men and women — including the divergence in women between objective and subjective responses, between body and mind — arise from innate factors rather than forces of culture.

One manifestation of this split has come in experimental attempts to use Viagra-like drugs to treat women who complain of deficient desire. By some estimates, 30 percent of women fall into this category, though plenty of sexologists argue that pharmaceutical companies have managed to drive up the figures as a way of generating awareness and demand. Desire, it seems, is usually in steady supply. In women, though, the main difficulty appears to be in the mind, not the body, so the physiological effects of the drugs have proved irrelevant.

As with other such drugs, one worry was that it would dull the libido. Yet in early trials, while it showed little promise for relieving depression, it left female — but not male — subjects feeling increased lust. Testosterone, so vital to male libido, appears crucial to females as well, and in drug trials involving postmenopausal women, testosterone patches have increased sexual activity. For the discord, in women, between the body and the mind, she has deliberated over all sorts of explanations, the simplest being anatomy.

The penis is external, its reactions more readily perceived and pressing upon consciousness. Women might more likely have grown up, for reasons of both bodily architecture and culture — and here was culture again, undercutting clarity — with a dimmer awareness of the erotic messages of their genitals.

Chivers said she has considered, too, research suggesting that men are better able than women to perceive increases in heart rate at moments of heightened stress and that men may rely more on such physiological signals to define their emotional states, while women depend more on situational cues. So there are hints, she told me, that the disparity between the objective and the subjective might exist, for women, in areas other than sex.

And this disconnection, according to yet another study she mentioned, is accentuated in women with acutely negative feelings about their own bodies. Lust, in this formulation, resides in the subjective, the cognitive; physiological arousal reveals little about desire.

Besides the bonobos, a body of evidence involving rape has influenced her construction of separate systems. She has confronted clinical research reporting not only genital arousal but also the occasional occurrence of orgasm during sexual assault. And she has recalled her own experience as a therapist with victims who recounted these physical responses. She is familiar, as well, with the preliminary results of a laboratory study showing surges of vaginal blood flow as subjects listen to descriptions of rape scenes.

So, in an attempt to understand arousal in the context of unwanted sex, Chivers, like a handful of other sexologists, has arrived at an evolutionary hypothesis that stresses the difference between reflexive sexual readiness and desire.

Ancestral women who did not show an automatic vaginal response to sexual cues may have been more likely to experience injuries during unwanted vaginal penetration that resulted in illness, infertility or even death, and thus would be less likely to have passed on this trait to their offspring. And she wondered if the theory explained why heterosexual women responded genitally more to the exercising woman than to the ambling man.

You need something complementary. That receptivity element. The study Chivers is working on now tries to re-examine the results of her earlier research, to investigate, with audiotaped stories rather than filmed scenes, the apparent rudderlessness of female arousal. But it will offer too a glimpse into the role of relationships in female eros. Chivers is perpetually devising experiments to perform in the future, and one would test how tightly linked the system of arousal is to the mechanisms of desire.

She would like to follow the sexual behavior of women in the days after they are exposed to stimuli in her lab.

If stimuli that cause physiological response — but that do not elicit a positive rating on the keypad — lead to increased erotic fantasies, masturbation or sexual activity with a partner, then she could deduce a tight link. Though women may not want, in reality, what such stimuli present, Chivers could begin to infer that what is judged unappealing does, nevertheless, turn women on.

The relationship with DeGeneres ended after two years, and Heche went on to marry a man. After 12 years together, the pair separated and Cypher — like Heche — has returned to heterosexual relationships. Diamond is a tireless researcher. The study that led to her book has been going on for more than 10 years. During that time, she has followed the erotic attractions of nearly young women who, at the start of her work, identified themselves as either lesbian or bisexual or refused a label.

From her analysis of the many shifts they made between sexual identities and from their detailed descriptions of their erotic lives, Diamond argues that for her participants, and quite possibly for women on the whole, desire is malleable, that it cannot be captured by asking women to categorize their attractions at any single point, that to do so is to apply a male paradigm of more fixed sexual orientation.

Among the women in her group who called themselves lesbian, to take one bit of the evidence she assembles to back her ideas, just one-third reported attraction solely to women as her research unfolded. And with the other two-thirds, the explanation for their periodic attraction to men was not a cultural pressure to conform but rather a genuine desire.

She acknowledged this. But she emphasized that the pattern for her group over the years, both in the changing categories they chose and in the stories they told, was toward an increased sense of malleability. If female eros found its true expression over the course of her long research, then flexibility is embedded in the nature of female desire.

One reason for this phenomenon, she suggests, may be found in oxytocin, a neurotransmitter unique to mammalian brains. For Diamond, all of this helps to explain why, in women, the link between intimacy and desire is especially potent. View all New York Times newsletters. She is now formulating an explanatory model of female desire that will appear later this year in Annual Review of Sex Research.

She spun numerous Hula-Hoops around her minimal waist and was hoisted by a cable high above the audience, where she spread her legs wider than seemed humanly possible.

The male, without an erection, is announcing a lack of arousal. The critical part played by being desired, Julia Heiman observed, is an emerging theme in the current study of female sexuality. Meana made clear, during our conversations in a casino bar and on the U. With her graduate student Amy Lykins, she published, in Archives of Sexual Behavior last year, a study of visual attention in heterosexual men and women.

Wearing goggles that track eye movement, her subjects looked at pictures of heterosexual foreplay. The men stared far more at the females, their faces and bodies, than at the males. The women gazed equally at the two genders, their eyes drawn to the faces of the men and to the bodies of the women — to the facial expressions, perhaps, of men in states of wanting, and to the sexual allure embodied in the female figures.

They can sometimes be hard to fix but are vital if you want your partner to get turned on more often and more easily. Next is the equally important but thankfully easier to solve problems that act as Brakes to her sex drive.

This phase of increased sexual desire is not as pronounced as in other mammals; however, it can be tracked. For most women, ovulation occurs at the midpoint of the cycle.

Divide the number of days by two. This midpoint is when ovulation occurs. For instance — if the total cycle is 30 days, ovulation occurs on day Desire is usually lowest on the days before her period when women experience PMS Premenstrual syndrome [ 41 ]. Cramps and other physical pain definitely have a way of acting as a Brake to her sex drive, but this is obviously not unique to women. Physical pain reduces the sex drive in both genders but may do so more often in women [ 42 ].

However, women may experience pain that is specific to the pelvic area, which can make sex physically impossible, unlike a man. Note that some women are especially horny just before their periods and some experience increased desire during their periods [ 43 ]. Stopping her period is not practical, but being aware of this natural Brake to her sex drive will help you plan around it or to help her better deal with pain on the worst days. In most cases, women going through menopause will experience a marked reduction in their sex drive.

Menopause is defined by the reduction of the sex hormones — estrogen — in the female body [ 44 ]. This acts as a serious Brake to the sex drive of most women as they will experience a reduced sensitivity to touching and decreased blood flow to erogenous zones, creating a more difficult arousal process. After menopause, regular sex is the best natural way to keep blood flowing to the sexual organs and maintain ongoing arousal.

Hormone therapy has also been proven to help some women maintain libido and increase sensitivity. Studies have shown that exercise improves sex drive in women of all ages [ 45 ].

Exercise also helps improve self-esteem and the physical aesthetic of the body. A sedentary lifestyle is a dangerous Brake to her sex drive. However, too much exercise can also be a problem as well. The ideal exercise level for most women is just over 20 minutes of moderate-intense exercise per day with muscle-strengthening activities twice weekly [ 46 ]. Experiencing, or even witnessing, a sexual assault can cause a woman to feel uncomfortable with a partner [ 47 ].

Nervous energy acts as a Brake to her sex drive as it inhibits blood flow to erogenous zones. It also keeps the brain from releasing serotonin, a hormone that increases feelings of happiness and also triggers the body to release estrogen.

A non-sexual assault may have the same effects on the female sex drive, although not as pronounced. Patience and professional therapy are the two keys in overcoming both sexual and non-sexual trauma. Begin a program of professional treatment, and lead your partner slowly into comfort with you by first making her feel comfortable in non-sexual situations.

Sexual shame in women can come from many sources, or multiple sources and act as a very hard Brake to her getting turned on. As mentioned above, sexual trauma may be a source of sexual shame. However, religious beliefs, personal beliefs, and social pressures may also play a part. In many case, shame leads to physical anxiety [ 48 ], which leads to a lower sex drive.

In many cases, religion, personal beliefs and social pressures are intertwined with each other. Women who are sexually liberated are often viewed unfavorably in all of these social circles.

Each of these groups may also contain many of the same people. If sexual shame comes from a violent trauma, it is usually best to enlist the aid of a professional therapist. Shame in other respects can be dealt with similarly or approached by introducing alternative perspectives to your partner. It is important that your partner make her own decisions about sexual behavior — never attempt to force a new belief on her. Besides, this often has the reverse effect and may cause her to hold on more tightly to her current beliefs.

Hemorrhaging is most likely to occur after a C-section cesarean birth. Postpartum hemorrhaging may occur because the uterus loses its ability to contract. This may also be connected to weakened vaginal muscles. Prolapsing is another condition that may occur because of the weakened state of the body after giving birth. Weak vaginal muscles may allow the bladder to bulge into the roof of the vagina. It may become harder to excrete waste from the body under these conditions, but it is very important not to strain the bladder to do so.

Keep in mind that a woman may experience a lower sex drive even if there are no medical complications with a birth. Although PPD is common enough to affect 1 out of 9 women [ 50 ], many women are reluctant to admit their mood after having a baby. Untreated postpartum depression can seriously impact both of you — and the baby.

The female body also loses estrogen after the birth and during breastfeeding, which may cause a drying of the vagina and less pleasure during sex [ 51 , 52 , 53 ]. If any of the conditions above are present, talk to a doctor immediately.

Both hemorrhaging and prolapsing may escalate into more serious conditions if left untreated, and postpartum depression has led some women to end their lives. If the doctor does not recommend an intensive treatment program for physical complications, the best way to improve sex drive is Kegel exercises to strengthen pelvic muscles. Weight — If a woman is obese [ 54 ], it can drastically affect her sex drive, becoming a major Brake to her getting turned on.

In both cases, the body is likely having trouble with its core functions, making it difficult to produce the hormones that regulate and increase sexual pleasure [ 55 ]. Furthermore, extreme weight issues also often correspond with or cause self-esteem issues, which can be another serious roadblock when you want to turn her on. Diabetes — Unregulated blood sugar levels in the body as can happen with diabetes correspond with yeast infections [ 56 , 57 ]. Both of these conditions cause a decrease in sex drive, as sex can become physically uncomfortable or even painful.

Depression — In , an estimated Furthermore, 1 in 6 people will struggle with depression during their lifetime [ 63 ]. Depression starts in the brain, and it is the brain that regulates the secretion of sex hormones. When the brain is depressed, it acts as a Brake because it does not give the body these vital hormones that cause an increase in sexual arousal. Neurological disease — Any disease or condition that affects the brain has the potential to act as a Brake to her libido and getting turned on.

One study found that lowered desire was experienced by women with depression more than any other sexual dysfunction [ 65 ]. If your partner is experiencing any of the conditions above, it is important to talk to a doctor immediately. A professional treatment program may be necessary, or a change in lifestyle. Antidepressants — Depression can reduce libido in women, and so can the treatment for depression. Previous treatments which addressed central nervous system depression also dampened sexual desire.

The FDA recently approved a medication, Addyi [ 68 ], for the treatment of sexual dysfunction in women. Addyi targets neurotransmitters. Smoking — Smoking, in general, reduces blood flow around the body [ 70 , 71 , 72 ], which can act as a Brake to getting turned on. Alcohol — Although one or two drinks have the ability to remove mental blocks aka the Brakes to getting turned on and increase physiological stimulation, you might find that one or both of you desires sex less when you drink too much.

Illegal drugs — Illegal drugs also have the ability to remove mental blocks and increase physiological stimulation. However, everyone responds differently to drugs leading them to potentially becoming a Brake to getting turned on.

The unregulated nature of illegal substances also means that you may not know what you are taking. Drugs may be mixed or given in too high of a dose. Birth control — Unfortunately, the very thing that should enable you to have sex more frequently and with fewer worries can wreak havoc on sex drive, with some affecting desire more than others [ 73 ].

However, birth control can also increase sex drive in some women [ 74 ]. If your partner suspects that birth control has lowered her sex drive, there might not be anything you can do to turn her on, and she should talk to her doctor about non-hormonal options such as the copper IUD more about birth control options. You can also use condoms rather than hormonal birth control. A little lube might be all you need to deal with this temporary Brake, however. Studies have found that sexual desire peaks in the mid-twenties, late twenties, and thirties.

For example, many of the factors mentioned above, most notably sexual shame, may play a role in women hiding the libido of their early 20s. By their 30s, however, many women may seem more open to sex because their motives are different [ 77 ] and less influenced by what other people think.

Women may also feel more comfortable with their bodies and have an easier time communicating in their 30s [ 78 ]. Some people wonder whether society prevented women from admitting their sexual feelings, both in studies just as they did in everyday life.

As women aged and society changed, perhaps it became easier to admit the sexual desires that existed all along. Regardless, sex drive waxes and wanes as we grow, both together and with our partners. Fertility in women begins to drop around in her late twenties [ 79 ]. Because fertility influences sex drive, we assume that desire drops as well. As a woman ages, her ovaries gradually stop functioning [ 76 ], leading to a complete cessation of function that we know as menopause.

Still, many older women remain interested in sex [ 81 ]. Find out how women can still have amazing sex after menopause. Finishing up quickly, other Brakes include….

Of course, men are not strangers to the concept of performance anxiety or sexual anxiety in general. Check out this post on sexual anxiety for tips that you can use to beat it. As you know, anxiety can also make it difficult to get and stay hard. Positive body image must come from within, and cannot simply be a result of your attraction to her, however.

Comfortableness with you — If you are not yet fully comfortable with each other, then this can sometimes act as a Brake to becoming turned on.

Thankfully this usually resolves itself with time. As you get to know one another better, comfort increases. Before you have sex for the first time or perhaps with casual partners , you can take a few steps to build comfort.

The solution here is experience and getting her to figure it out, usually through masturbation tips here. Fear of the consequences of sex — Fear of getting pregnant learn how to prevent it or contracting an STI is a major Brake. Of course, I would caution you to stay aware of everything I have just talked about as life changes all the time and your partner may start experiencing new issues that start acting as Brakes to her ability to get turned on.

This is just the beginning of learning how to give your girl the most powerful orgasms of her life. I put together an instructional video demonstrating my most effective techniques for making your girl squirt, shake, scream and scratch your back. If you want to learn them, so that you can give her orgasms so powerful that she becomes emotionally and sexually addicted to you, then you will probably want to watch it here. Thanks for the SUPER information here, it give me inspiration to continue to help her work through her issues.

You are real man! Great article! Being overweight or underweight can seriously affect sexual desire! Also if someone was malnourished due to strict dieting and overexercising, or even just being on a clean eating whatever trendy diet, the body shuts down some biological functions — just as sex drive. So be careful, guys!

As women age, and sometimes health issues, the vagina will be slow to, or cease to, moisten its self in preparation for sexual union. Your email address will not be published. Moving parents to assisted living.