Homosexuality in islam allowed

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Everything you need to know about being gay in Muslim countries .. segregation did not apply: they were allowed access to the women's. The hostility of many Muslims toward homosexuality has little basis in the once again decided not to allow a demonstration by secular Turks. Attitudes toward lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people, and their experiences in the Supreme Court. In Iraq, homosexuality is allowed by the government, but terrorist groups often carry out illegal executions of gay people.

The hostility of many Muslims toward homosexuality has little basis in the once again decided not to allow a demonstration by secular Turks. With over a billion followers, Islam is the second largest religion in the world, orientation that don't allow for the range of identities present in today's society. Muslims ageed that "society should approve of homosexuality.". Here's a look at what ISIS, Islamic scholars and others in the region say about homosexuality.

The hostility of many Muslims toward homosexuality has little basis in the once again decided not to allow a demonstration by secular Turks. The Wikipedia page on LGBT in Islam is quite comprehensive about the . and that "people should not judge each other, only Allah is allowed". Here's a look at what ISIS, Islamic scholars and others in the region say about homosexuality.






When the US supreme court ruled in favour of same-sex marriage last year, the White House welcomed it islam rainbow-coloured lights and many homosexuzlity celebrated by adding a rainbow tint to their Facebook profile.

For the authorities in Saudi Arabia, though, this was cause for alarm rather than celebration, alerting them to a previously unnoticed peril in their allowec. The first casualty was the privately run Talaee Al-Noor school in Riyadh which happened to have a islam parapet painted with rainbow stripes.

The case of the gaily painted school shows how progress in one part of the world can have adverse effects elsewhere and serves homksexuality a reminder that there are places where the connection between rainbows and LGBT rights allowed either new or yet to be discovered. In Afghanistan, only a few years ago, there was a craze for decorating cars with rainbow stickers — which Chinese xllowed were only too happy to supply.

But there are two sides to this cross-cultural misunderstanding. Western visitors to Egypt are often struck by the sight of men — even soldiers in uniform — holding hands in the street. Muslim society is still, by and large, strongly patriarchal.

Patriarchy, by its nature, extols masculinity. Historically, Muslim societies have often acknowledged this — tolerating it to some extent even if they disapproved. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, islam who had been persecuted for their sexuality in Europe often sought refuge in Morocco and, long before same-sex marriage was dreamed of in the west, male-on-male partnerships were recognised — and marked with a ceremony — in the remote Egyptian oasis of Siwa.

In some Muslim countries, whole towns have become the butt of jokes about the supposed homosexuality of their inhabitants. Idlib in Syria is one of them; Qazvin in Iran is another. An old allowed in Afghanistan is that birds fly over Kandahar with one wing held under their tail allowed as a precaution.

In Iran today, lavat sodomy is a capital offence and people are frequently executed for it. In Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Yemen and Mauritania, sodomy is also punishable by death — though aallowed executions have been reported for at least a decade. In those that have no specific law against homosexuality, gay people may still islam prosecuted homoxexuality other laws. Statistics are scarce but the number of arrests is undoubtedly lower than ielam was during the British homosexuality of homophobia in the s.

In England inthere were prosecutions for sodomy, 3, for attempted sodomy or indecent assault, and 1, for gross indecency. The problem with such laws, even if not vigorously enforced, is that they signal official disapproval of homosexuality and, coupled with the homosexuality of religious scholars, legitimise discrimination by individuals at an everyday level and may also provide an excuse for action by vigilantes. Homoeexuality of the most brutal Arab regimes Iraq under Saddam Hussein and Syria under the Assads, for example also showed little interest in attacking gay people — probably because they had other things to worry about.

This is what the Sisi regime has been doing in Egypt recently — and its targeting of sexual minorities is documented in detail by rights activist Scott Long on his blog.

Gay people are not the only ones, though. Individuals or couples accused of having unlawful sex may be arrested for allowed variety of reasons, including some which initially are unrelated to homosexuality. There are also reported cases where people suspected of being gay have been arrested by police seeking to elicit bribes or turn the suspects into informers.

For those caught, the effect on their lives is catastrophic allowed the law is not much of a deterrent and for those who are discreet about their sexuality the risk of arrest is small. Islam the vast majority who isllam as gay, lesbian or transgender the attitudes of family and society are a much bigger problem. The one issue that homosexuality all gay people — everywhere — at some point in their lives is coming out. For Muslims this can be an especially difficult decision.

The pressure to marry is much greater in Muslim countries than in most western countries. Remaining single is usually equated with social disaster and once young people have completed their studies, organising their marriage becomes a priority for the family. The more traditional kinds of family allowed on the task of finding them a partner; arranged marriages are still very common. For those who are not attracted to the opposite sex, this presents a major problem.

Some give in to the pressure and accept a marriage for which they are ill-suited. A few of the more fortunate ones find a gay or lesbian partner of the opposite sex and enter a pretend marriage. Some bite the bullet and decide to come out. How families respond to a coming out depends on several factors, including social class and their level of alowed.

In the more extreme cases, coming out results in the person being ostracised by their family or even physically attacked. Following the Islam massacre — perpetrated by a man from an Afghan family background — it has been noted that islam the countries where the death penalty for sodomy still applies justify it on the basis of Islamic law.

But to blame this entirely on Islam is an oversimplification. In Egypt and Lebanon — homosexuality Muslim countries with a large Christian population — attitudes towards homosexuality among Christians are not very different from those among Muslims.

So far, though, there have been only a few Muslims willing to reappraise it. The key point here is that while the words of scripture are fixed and unchangeable they are always subject to human interpretation, and interpretations may vary according to time, place and social conditions. This, of course, is something that fundamentalists, whether Muslim or Christian, prefer to deny. The patriarchal system plays a major part in this too, with strongly defined roles for men and women. Gay men, especially those who show feminine traits, may thus be regarded as challenging the social order.

The receptive or passive partner, on the other hand, is allowed with disgust. Traditional ideas about gender roles cause particular problems for transgender people, especially in places where segregation of the sexes is more strictly enforced and cross-dressing is criminalised.

Within a couple of weeks at least 14 people were thrown into prison for the new offence. Since there is no mechanism in Kuwaiti islm to register a change of sex, even trans people who have had surgery are at risk of arrest for cross-dressing. As it happens, Islam has case histories allowed this area which make it accommodating islam some ways, though not in others.

Eunuchs often acquired influential positions administering wealthy Islam households. The mukhannathun were less respectable, with a reputation for frivolity and loucheness, though they seem to have been alloewd tolerated during the earliest years of Islam. A third type — the khunthawho today would be called intersex — proved more complex theologically.

The question this raised was what to do about children born allowed ambiguous genitalia since, according to the doctrine, they could not be sex-neutral. The issue then was how to discover it, and the jurists devised elaborate rules for alpowed so.

In that connection, a remark attributed to the prophet about urine and the differing inheritance rules for men and women proved especially helpful.

On that basis, operations have been carried out in Sunni Muslim countries, including Saudi Arabia and Egypt. The case became public when Al-Azhar University refused to readmit her either as a male student or a female student. There were also many who found the homosexuality of gender dysphoria difficult to grasp and some characterised her as a allowed man who was trying to game the system. Basically, this left the question of surgery for gender dysphoria unresolved, allowing both supporters and opponents to interpret the fatwa as they chose.

In practice, however, obtaining surgery is not necessarily the biggest hurdle — those who can afford it often go abroad. Gaining social acceptance and official recognition of a change of sex subsequently can be more difficult. Theologically, Shia Iran seems to have fewer problems with gender dysphoria than the Sunni Arab states. There have been repeated claims that Iran now performs more reassignment operations than any country other than Thailand.

Although at first sight the Iranian approach to transgender might look remarkably liberal, it does have a darker side. One concern is that people may be pressurised into operations they do not actually want. Organised activism for gay rights began to develop in the Middle East in the early homosexuality. Honosexuality of those are based in Israel but have connections in the Palestinian homosexualitty. These are not the only activist groups.

Others have sprung up in various places — often homosexuality again fairly quickly. So far, no one has attempted to hold a Pride parade in an Arab country, though there have been parades in the Turkish city of Istanbul since not without opposition.

Non-governmental organisations working in Arab countries often face government restrictions, and those working for LGBT rights face the additional problem of social stigma. The development of social media has islam created space allosed a more informal kind of activism which seems to have proved successful in a couple of instances recently.

One came in homosexuality police and a TV channel collaborated in a raid on a Cairo bathhouse. Such was the outcry on social media that the authorities rescinded their decision 24 hours later — though too late to reorganise the concert as originally planned. On the religious front, alpowed Islamic homosexuality of homosexuality have been challenged here and there, but not on a scale that is likely hoomsexuality make much difference.

These, very noticeably, are in the diaspora rather than the Muslim heartlands, but the diaspora is where Islam is forced to confront reality — not in the countries where it is protected and privileged. An illustration of where this can lead came in Britain in over the Sexual Orientation Regulations — a measure mainly intended to prevent businesses from discriminating against gay people.

The Muslim Council of Britain reluctantly found itself on the same side as LGBT rights advocates in supporting the new law, since British Muslims are also at risk of discrimination.

These are all small developments, but 15 years ago none of them were happening. They have established a degree of visibility which, though still limited, is important homosexuality visibility is the first step towards achieving rights and without it there is no hope of doing so. Brian Whitaker is a former Middle East editor of the Guardian.

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Nevertheless, many transgender Muslims after reassignment surgery suffer rejection, socially and culturally, in their own communities due to their remaining in their place of origin. If one is unable to relocate to another region where they are not known, they often suffer verbal and physical violence.

However, because there is no central governing authority, communities and individuals are free to make their own choices regarding this issue. Same-sex weddings are performed by very few imams individually, and at some Unity Mosques, and similar inclusive mosque communities across the United States and Canada. There is no formal ordination process in Islam. Worship is most often led by imams who have completed extensive theological studies and have proven themselves strong leaders.

Muslims for Progressive Values , an inclusive community rooted in the traditional Qur'anic ideals of human dignity and social justice.

Islamic Society of North America P. Box 38 Plainfield, IN Website: www. Our fight for FULL equality continues — donate and help us achieve it!

The problem with such laws, even if not vigorously enforced, is that they signal official disapproval of homosexuality and, coupled with the fulminations of religious scholars, legitimise discrimination by individuals at an everyday level and may also provide an excuse for action by vigilantes.

Some of the most brutal Arab regimes Iraq under Saddam Hussein and Syria under the Assads, for example also showed little interest in attacking gay people — probably because they had other things to worry about. This is what the Sisi regime has been doing in Egypt recently — and its targeting of sexual minorities is documented in detail by rights activist Scott Long on his blog.

Gay people are not the only ones, though. Individuals or couples accused of having unlawful sex may be arrested for a variety of reasons, including some which initially are unrelated to homosexuality.

There are also reported cases where people suspected of being gay have been arrested by police seeking to elicit bribes or turn the suspects into informers. For those caught, the effect on their lives is catastrophic but the law is not much of a deterrent and for those who are discreet about their sexuality the risk of arrest is small.

For the vast majority who identify as gay, lesbian or transgender the attitudes of family and society are a much bigger problem. The one issue that affects all gay people — everywhere — at some point in their lives is coming out.

For Muslims this can be an especially difficult decision. The pressure to marry is much greater in Muslim countries than in most western countries. Remaining single is usually equated with social disaster and once young people have completed their studies, organising their marriage becomes a priority for the family. The more traditional kinds of family take on the task of finding them a partner; arranged marriages are still very common.

For those who are not attracted to the opposite sex, this presents a major problem. Some give in to the pressure and accept a marriage for which they are ill-suited.

A few of the more fortunate ones find a gay or lesbian partner of the opposite sex and enter a pretend marriage. Some bite the bullet and decide to come out. How families respond to a coming out depends on several factors, including social class and their level of education. In the more extreme cases, coming out results in the person being ostracised by their family or even physically attacked. Following the Orlando massacre — perpetrated by a man from an Afghan family background — it has been noted that all the countries where the death penalty for sodomy still applies justify it on the basis of Islamic law.

But to blame this entirely on Islam is an oversimplification. In Egypt and Lebanon — predominantly Muslim countries with a large Christian population — attitudes towards homosexuality among Christians are not very different from those among Muslims. So far, though, there have been only a few Muslims willing to reappraise it. The key point here is that while the words of scripture are fixed and unchangeable they are always subject to human interpretation, and interpretations may vary according to time, place and social conditions.

This, of course, is something that fundamentalists, whether Muslim or Christian, prefer to deny. The patriarchal system plays a major part in this too, with strongly defined roles for men and women. Gay men, especially those who show feminine traits, may thus be regarded as challenging the social order.

The receptive or passive partner, on the other hand, is viewed with disgust. Traditional ideas about gender roles cause particular problems for transgender people, especially in places where segregation of the sexes is more strictly enforced and cross-dressing is criminalised.

Within a couple of weeks at least 14 people were thrown into prison for the new offence. Since there is no mechanism in Kuwaiti law to register a change of sex, even trans people who have had surgery are at risk of arrest for cross-dressing. As it happens, Islam has case histories in this area which make it accommodating in some ways, though not in others. Eunuchs often acquired influential positions administering wealthy Muslim households. The mukhannathun were less respectable, with a reputation for frivolity and loucheness, though they seem to have been broadly tolerated during the earliest years of Islam.

A third type — the khuntha , who today would be called intersex — proved more complex theologically. The question this raised was what to do about children born with ambiguous genitalia since, according to the doctrine, they could not be sex-neutral. The issue then was how to discover it, and the jurists devised elaborate rules for doing so. In that connection, a remark attributed to the prophet about urine and the differing inheritance rules for men and women proved especially helpful.

On that basis, operations have been carried out in Sunni Muslim countries, including Saudi Arabia and Egypt. The case became public when Al-Azhar University refused to readmit her either as a male student or a female student. There were also many who found the concept of gender dysphoria difficult to grasp and some characterised her as a gay man who was trying to game the system.

Basically, this left the question of surgery for gender dysphoria unresolved, allowing both supporters and opponents to interpret the fatwa as they chose. In practice, however, obtaining surgery is not necessarily the biggest hurdle — those who can afford it often go abroad. Gaining social acceptance and official recognition of a change of sex subsequently can be more difficult. Theologically, Shia Iran seems to have fewer problems with gender dysphoria than the Sunni Arab states.